Glaucoma/Ocular hypertension

Glaucoma

 

Glaucoma is a term that describes a group of eye conditions that affect vision. Glaucoma often affects both eyes, usually in varying degrees. One eye may develop glaucoma quicker than the other.

 

Glaucoma occurs when the drainage tubes (trabecular meshwork) within the eye become slightly blocked. This prevents eye fluid (aqueous humour) from draining properly.

 

When the fluid cannot drain properly, pressure builds up. This is called intraocular pressure. This can damage the optic nerve (which connects the eye to the brain) and the nerve fibres from the retina (the light-sensitive nerve tissue that lines the back of the eye).

 

Attending regular optician appointments will help to ensure any signs of glaucoma can be detected early and allow treatment to begin.

 

To learn more about Glaucoma you can download our leaflet here

 


 

Ocular Hypertension

 

 

Ocular Hypertension is when the pressure in the eye is higher than normal. Eye pressure is expressed in millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), the same unit of measurement used in weather barometers. While normal eye pressure has historically been considered a measurement of less than 21 mm Hg, this normal "normal" upper limit may vary in different populations.

 

Ocular hypertension is not the same as glaucoma, which is a disease of the eye often caused by high intraocular pressure. In people with ocular hypertension, the optic nerve appears normal and no signs of glaucoma are found during visual field testing, which tests side (peripheral) vision. However, people with ocular hypertension are considered “glaucoma suspects,” meaning they should be monitored closely by an ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) to make sure that they do not develop glaucoma.